Intimate partner violence, forced first sex and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a sample of Zimbabwean women accessing maternal and child health care

Shamu S, Munjanja S, Zarowsky C, Shamu P, Temmerman M, Abrahams N

Intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a serious problem with a wide range of health consequences including poor maternal and newborn health outcomes. We assessed the relationship between IPV, forced first sex (FFS) and maternal and newborn health outcomes and concluded that strengthening primary and secondary violence prevention is required to improve pregnancy-related outcomes.

May 18, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
intimate partner violence (IPV), maternal and newborn health, violence prevention, gender-based violence (GBV), health outcomes, forced sex

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