International Workshop on HIV & Adolescence 2020

Workshop logo

Adolescents are developmentally at a difficult crossroads, which makes it challenging to attract and sustain adolescents’ focus on maintaining their health. Every effort must be made to engage and retain adolescents in care so they can improve and maintain their health for the long term.

The medical advances that have transformed HIV treatment into a manageable disease have yet to alter the stark reality for young people within key populations, particularly in low to middle-income countries, such as those in Sub-Saharan Africa. Even as AIDS-related mortality has decreased overall in recent years, AIDS-related deaths among adolescents increased by 50%. In other words, AIDS is far from over - especially for young people.

At major meetings, advances in HIV management focuses mainly on either adults or children, often excluding adolescents as a key population. We have initiated the International Workshop on HIV & Adolescence to meet this need for international interchange and advance the field by addressing challenges with innovative solutions.

This workshop is set up as an inclusive summit for multidisciplinary experts working with adolescents affected by HIV. The objective will be to share experiences, knowledge, and best practices with the aim of defining a pathway forward for optimizing the care of adolescents living with HIV.

The program will cover the entire spectrum of developmental changes in adolescents including social, behavioral, physiological, and biological aspects and the impact of an HIV-positive status. Prevention programs, testing, treatment, and support services among adolescents shall be discussed. The barriers encountered in delivering these services and ways to mitigate these barriers shall be key areas of discussion during the workshop.

Registration is free for those who are 25 years old or younger.

October 21, 2020
Year of publication
2020
Resource types
Conference
Tags
adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), HIV-positive youth, adolescents and young adults (AYA)

Similar Resources

The 9th South African AIDS Conference took place from 11-14 June 2019 in Durban, South Africa, and the SHARE team was there to bring you updates, related content, and live coverage! The Conference focused on unprecedented scientific, social and digital innovations and technologies which could…

The International AIDS Conference (IAC) is by far the largest conference on HIV related issues. This prestigious conference is the premier gathering for those working in the field of HIV, as well as policy makers, people living with HIV and others committed to ending the epidemic.

Timely access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is vital to ensuring safe motherhood and reducing vertical transmission. Treatment guidance and programming has changed dramatically in recent years.

To understand the uptake of HIV services by adolescent women, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis of patient-level data (2011–2013) on services for antenatal care (ANC) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in 36 facilities in 5 districts in Zimbabwe.

The latest global results highlight PEPFAR-supported activities across the countries in which the organization works.

AVERT's searchable hub is a comprehensive collection of all its HIV and AIDS-related infographics, videos, audio and photo galleries.

In our first issue, we have assembled 161 abstracts published from December 2017 through January 2018 that feature articles from Botswana (8), Lesotho (1), Malawi (19), Mozambique (9), Namibia (3), South Africa (82), Swaziland (10), Tanzania (2), Zambia (18) and Zimbabwe (19).
In our second issue, we have assembled 84 abstracts published from February through March 2018 that feature articles from Botswana (4), DRC (1), Lesotho (5), Malawi (16), South Africa (39), Swaziland (5), Zambia (5) and Zimbabwe (9).
In our third issue, we have assembled 72 abstracts published from April through May 2018 that feature articles from Botswana (4), Lesotho (2), Malawi (7), Mozambique (5), South Africa (43), Swaziland (2), Tanzania (4), Zambia (2) and Zimbabwe (9).
In our fourth issue, we have assembled 68 abstracts published from June through July 2018 that feature evidence from Angola (1), Botswana (1), Eswatini (2), Malawi (11), Mozambique (3), South Africa (36), Zambia (6) and Zimbabwe (10).