Infants treated within days of birth can clear HIV reservoir rapidly

Keith Alcorn

Viral load and viral DNA fall rapidly in infants who begin antiretroviral therapy (ART) within days of birth, two South African studies have found, showing the potential for clearing the reservoir of HIV-infected cells – but infants with such a dramatic response to treatment may be a minority. The findings were presented on Tuesday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle.

Clearing the reservoir of HIV-infected cells is considered to be essential for developing an eventual cure for HIV infection, whether in the form of complete elimination of the virus or in the form of long-term viral control without medication, known as a functional cure.

February 27, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Conference materials, Journal and research articles
Tags
viral load, viral DNA, HIV-positive infants, treatment, ART, antiretroviral therapy, HIV reservoir, CROI 2017, functional cure

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