Incidence and risk factors for hypertension among HIV patients in rural Tanzania – A prospective cohort study

Eduardo Rodríguez-Arbolí, Kim Mwamelo, Aneth Vedastus Kalinjuma, Hansjakob Furrer, Christoph Hatz, Marcel Tanner, Manuel Battegay, Emilio Letang

Scarce data are available on the epidemiology of hypertension among HIV patients in rural sub-Saharan Africa. We explored the prevalence, incidence and risk factors for incident hypertension among patients who were enrolled in a rural HIV cohort in Tanzania.

March 28, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Case studies and success stories, Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
hypertension, HIV patients, Tanzania

Similar Resources

According to the World Health Organization, South Africa ranks as one of the highest burden of TB, TB/HIV co-infection, and drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) countries.

In 2014, USAID/Tanzania awarded the Tanzania Strengthening Police and Prison Comprehensive HIV Services (SPPCHS) project as an initiative under the AIDSFree project.

The heightened risk of HIV infection among female sex workers (FSWs) has been clearly established across settings. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), FSWs have an estimated HIV prevalence of 36.9% as compared to 7.4% in the general adult female population. In the Iringa region of Tanzania, a…

This issue of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society's "HIV Nursing Matters" online magazine focuses on vulnerable populations, including TB in prisons and intimate partner violence in the context of HIV.

This issue of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society's "HIV Nursing Matters" online magazine focuses on key populations.

There is significant attrition at each stage of the HIV care continuum in South Africa, according to a study published in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. The population-based research was conducted in North West Province and revealed that of…

Previous estimates of the burden of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among people who inject drugs have not included estimates of the burden attributable to the consequences of past injecting.

Researchers from the Dutch pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) demonstration study, AmPrEP, have found an unexpectedly high rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in participants tested for it at baseline.

The HIV epidemic in the population of Nairobi as a whole is in decline, but a concentrated sub-epidemic persists in key populations.