HIV treatment cascade

AVERT

The HIV treatment cascade is a model that outlines the steps of care that people living with HIV go through from initial diagnosis to achieving viral suppression (a very low level of HIV in the body), and shows the proportion of individuals living with HIV who are engaged at each stage.

October 31, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Infographics, Reports and Fact sheets
Tags
care cascade, treatment cascade, HIV cascade, steps of care, linkage to care, diagnosis, retention in care, treatment, viral suppression, adherence, HIV counseling and testing (HCT)

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BACKGROUND:

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