HIV drug resistance report 2017

World Health Organization, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

This second HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) report provides an update on recent population levels of HIVDR covering the period 2014–2016. The report includes data from 16 nationally representative surveys from 14 countries estimating resistance in: adults initiating ART (PDR), children younger than 18 months newly diagnosed with HIV, and adults on ART (acquired HIV drug resistance or ADR).

To contextualize results from representative HIVDR surveys, the report is supported by systematic reviews of the published literature on PDR in adults, children and adolescents, and ADR in paediatric and adult populations.

Finally, the report includes the prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR) in recently infected people in Malawi and Zimbabwe, estimated as part of recent household Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (PHIA) surveys, supported by the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

July 21, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Reports and Fact sheets
Tags
WHO, drug resistance, antiretroviral therapy, ART, ARVs, treatment, drug resistant strains, treatment failure, adherence, HIV drug resistance, WHO guidelines, key populations, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Global Fund, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR), transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR), Malawi, Zimbabwe

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