HIV and the criminalisation of drug use among people who inject drugs: a systematic review

Kora DeBeck, Tessa Cheng, Julio S Montaner, Chris Beyrer, Richard Elliott, Susan Sherman, Evan Wood, Stefan Baral

Mounting evidence suggests that laws and policies prohibiting illegal drug use could have a central role in shaping health outcomes among people who inject drugs (PWID). To date, no systematic review has characterised the influence of laws and legal frameworks prohibiting drug use on HIV prevention and treatment.

June 26, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Systematic reviews
Tags
people who inject drugs (PWID), harm reduction, criminalization of drug use, treatment, HIV prevention, key populations, injecting drug users (IDUs)

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