Guidance on couples HIV testing and counselling, including antiretroviral therapy for treatment and prevention in serodiscordant couples

New WHO guidelines recommend offering HIV testing and counselling to couples, wherever HIV testing and counselling is available, including in antenatal clinics. For couples where only one partner is HIV positive, the guidelines recommend offering antiretroviral therapy to the HIV positive partner, regardless of his/her own immune status (CD4 count), to reduce the likelihood of HIV transmission to the HIV negative partner.

Today, only 40% of people with HIV globally know their HIV status. Up to 50% of HIV-positive people in on-going relationships have HIV-negative partners (i.e. they are in serodiscordant relationships). Of those HIV-positive individuals who know their status, many have not disclosed their HIV status to their partners, nor do they know their partners’ HIV status. Consequently, a significant number of new infections occur within serodiscordant couples.

CHTC offers couples the opportunity to test, receive their results and mutually disclose their status in an environment where support is provided by a counsellor/health worker. A range of prevention, treatment and support options can then be discussed and decided upon together, depending on the status of each partner.

Recent evidence confirms the benefit of early ART for people with a CD4 count above 350 cells/µL in preventing transmission to HIV-negative partners. In order to benefit from such opportunities, couples should be supported to test together and disclose their status to each other and access prevention, care and treatment services.

August 14, 2012
Year of publication
2012
Tags
treatment as prevention, counselling, WHO, couples, ARVs

Similar Resources

WHO updates HIV treatment guidance for pregnant women and preventing HIV infection in babies

 

This report presents progress made after two years of implementation of the ESA Commitment (2013-2015). Significant progress has already been made thanks to concerted action by governments, civil society, and development partners at national and regional level.

With new prevention strategies on the horizon and HIV incidence stabilizing or declining in many parts of the world, the tides are beginning to turn on the HIV epidemic. Between 2002 and 2010, new HIV infections globally declined from 3.1 million to 2.7 million.

The role of STIs in the transmission dynamics of HIV epidemics is paradoxical and complex. Population-based studies have found that both the prevalence and incidence of HIV were substantially higher among people with STIs.

The AIDSFree HIV Testing Services Community of Practice provides a forum to connect with and learn from peers working in HIV testing services around the world.

The HIV Prevention Update provides a representative sample of summaries and abstracts of recent articles on global HIV prevention issues from a variety of scientific, peer-reviewed journals.

The sub-Saharan Africa edition of Teen Talk, a question and answer guide for HIV-positive adolescents, was adapted from the Botswana version, published in 2010 by the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Centre of Excellence Teen Club Program, and the original version,…

The U.S. Government is committed and working toward the goal of Ending Preventable Child and Maternal Deaths (EPCMD) in a generation. In June of 2014, the U.S.

Donor funding for HIV programs has flattened out in recent years, which limits the ability of HIV programs worldwide to achieve universal access and sustain current progress. This study examines alternative mechanisms for resource mobilization.