Enhancing HIV Retention and Clinical Outcomes in Tanzania through Pediatric- and Adolescent-Friendly Services

Redempta Mbatia, Samwel Kikaro, Edward Mgelea, Francis Nyabukene, Christopher Henjewele, Lydia Temba, Sisty Moshi, Agnes Rubare, and Benedicta Masanja

Despite global reductions in AIDS-related deaths among adults, the rate for children increased by 50 percent. This increase points to inadequate testing, counselling, and treatment coverage and poor retention in services for these children. Pediatric- and adolescent-friendly health services have the potential to improve retention and clinical outcomes among children living with HIV. This study was conducted to provide evidence of the effectiveness of pediatric- and adolescent-friendly clinics in Kigoma, Tanzania.

July 20, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Reports and Fact sheets
Countries
Tags
AIDS-related deaths, pediatric HIV, treatment coverage, HIV testing and counseling (HTC), retention in care, children living with HIV, pediatric- and adolescent-friendly health services

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