Engaging Women to Strengthen VMMC Demand Creation Approaches for HIV Prevention

AIDSFree

Engaging women in the dialogue on VMMC can have broad impacts on voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programs, especially when women become aware that circumcision can reduce HIV risk. In Tanzania, AIDSFree found that women can influence men’s decisions to undergo VMMC and impact men’s willingness to get circumcised. An initiative to examine the role of women in demand creation resulted in changing the gender distribution of health promoters—by increasing the number of females to provide a more balanced perspective and approach to VMMC uptake.

January 24, 2017
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
VMMC programs, voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), HIV prevention, Tanzania, VMMC uptake

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Objective: This article provides an overview and interpretation of the performance of the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief’s (PEPFAR’s) male circumcision programme which has supported the majority of voluntary medical male circumcisions (VMMCs) performed for HIV prev