The effect of oral preexposure prophylaxis on the progression of HIV-1 seroconversion

Donnell D, Ramos E, Celum C, Baeten J, Dragavon J, Tappero J, Lingappa JR, Ronald A, Fife K, Coombs RW

This study investigated whether oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) alters timing and patterns of seroconversion when PrEP use continues after HIV-1 infection.

The study found that ongoing PrEP use in seroconverters may delay detection of infection and elongate seroconversion, although the delay does not increase risk of resistance.

May 23, 2018
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), seroconversion, HIV detection

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