Educating religious leaders to promote uptake of male circumcision in Tanzania: a cluster randomised trial

Downs, Jennifer A et al.

Male circumcision is being widely deployed as an HIV prevention strategy in countries with high HIV incidence, but its uptake in sub-Saharan Africa has been below targets. We did a study to establish whether educating religious leaders about male circumcision would increase uptake in their village.

February 22, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
male circumcision, HIV prevention, voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), religious leaders, Tanzania, HIV prevention interventions

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