Easy, Faster, and Not Bloody: Providers' Perceptions on PrePex™ in South Africa

Minja Milovanovic, Noah Taruberekera, Karin Hatzold, Neil Martinson and Limakatso Lebina

PrePex™ (Circ MedTech Ltd., Tortola, British Virgin Islands) devices are being evaluated in several countries for scale-up of medical male circumcision (MMC) as an HIV prevention intervention. Health care workers' perceptions should be considered prior to scale-up. A cross-sectional open-ended questionnaire was administered to health care workers from nine MMC programs in South Africa that provided either PrePex™ and surgical circumcision (mixed sites) or surgical circumcision only (surgery-only sites). A total of 77 health care workers (37 at mixed sites and 40 at surgery-only sites) with median ages of 29 years (interquartile range 27-37) and 34 years (interquartile range 29-42), respectively, were recruited into the study. The perceived benefits of PrePex™ MMC for health care workers were: device simplicity, convenience, bloodless, and ease of use. Identified challenges included limited public knowledge of device, pain, smell of necrotic skin, and delayed healing. Health care providers perceived the PrePex™ MMC device to be simple and adaptable for existing MMC programs.

September 8, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
PrePex, voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), VMMC, HIV prevention, health care workers, VMMC programming

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