Drivers of the Hyperepidemics of HIV in South Africa: Pt. 1, Social and Economic Risk Factors

Janet Fleischman, Produced by Alex Bush. Edited by Ribka Gemilangsari.

Professor Quarraisha Abdool Karim is one of the world’s leading AIDS researchers and has made pioneering contributions to understanding the HIV epidemic in young people, especially among young women. She joined us for a two-part series to explain her latest research into epidemic hot spots in KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, focusing on both the structural and biological risk factors that facilitate the spread of HIV in young women. In Part 1, she discusses the social and economic factors that contribute to the dramatic differences in HIV rates in women and men at different ages.

March 19, 2019
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Video and audio clips
Countries
Tags
drivers of HIV, hyperendemics, HIV hot spots, economic barriers

Similar Resources

Many countries are working to reduce or eliminate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. Prevention efforts have been conceptualized as steps in a cascade but cascade completion rates during and after pregnancy are low.

End-user input is critical to inform development of multipurpose prevention technology (MPT) products that prevent HIV and pregnancy.

Injectable, intrauterine, and implantable contraceptives have been prioritised for programmatic delivery because of high contraceptive efficacy and safety. Robust evidence on the relative risks, particularly HIV susceptibility, and benefits of these contraceptive methods is important to inform…

An essential first step in caring for HIV-infected children is accurate and early diagnosis of HIV, early HIV testing, prompt return of results, and rapid initiation of treatment.

Results from the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) Study were released at a session at the 9th South African AIDS Conference (SA AIDS 2019) in Durban, South Africa, on Thursday, June 13th. The session, which included presentations on the primary analysis, was recorded and…

Alcohol use is associated with increased HIV-risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and number of sex partners. Alcohol-serving venues can be places to engage in HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, but are also important sites of social support for patrons, which may mitigate risks.

In our third issue, we have assembled 72 abstracts published from April through May 2018 that feature articles from Botswana (4), Lesotho (2), Malawi (7), Mozambique (5), South Africa (43), Swaziland (2), Tanzania (4), Zambia (2) and Zimbabwe (9).

A number of antiretroviral HIV prevention products are efficacious in preventing HIV infection.

In our fourth issue, we have assembled 68 abstracts published from June through July 2018 that feature evidence from Angola (1), Botswana (1), Eswatini (2), Malawi (11), Mozambique (3), South Africa (36), Zambia (6) and Zimbabwe (10).
In our fifth issue, we have assembled 70 abstracts published from August through September 2018 that feature evidence from Botswana (3), Eswatini (5), Lesotho (2), Malawi (8), Mozambique (3), Namibia (3), South Africa (40), Tanzania (1), Zambia (12) and Zimbabwe (9).