Design and implementation of a community health worker HIV treatment and prevention intervention in an HIV hot spot fishing community in Rakai, Uganda

Amanda Long, Ismail Mbabali, Heidi E. Hutton, Alvin G. Thomas, Eva Bugos, Jeremiah Mulamba, Kathy Rivet Amico, Fred Nalugoda, Ronald H. Gray, Maria J. Wawer, Gertrude Nakigozi, Larry W. Chang

Innovative approaches are needed to increase engagement in HIV treatment and prevention services, particularly in HIV hot spots. Here, we detail our design, training approach, and early implementation experiences of a community-based HIV intervention called “health scouts.” The intervention, utilizing a novel, theory-based approach, trained 10 community residents in an HIV hot spot fishing community to use motivational interviewing strategies and a mobile phone–based counseling application. During the first 3 months, 771 residents (median 82/health scout, range 27-160) were counseled. A directly observed Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity scale–based evaluation found adequate performance (median score 20/25, range 11-23). The health scout intervention was feasible to implement in a high HIV-prevalence fishing community, and its impact on HIV care outcomes will be evaluated in an ongoing cluster randomized trial. If found to be effective, it may be an important strategy for responding to HIV in high-burden settings.

October 12, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
HIV treatment and prevention services, HIV hotspots, health scouts, HIV hot spots, community-based interventions, Uganda, fishing communities, mobile phone-based interventions, mobile phone–based counseling, mobile apps, HIV care outcomes, key populations

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