Depression and Oral FTC/TDF Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Among Men and Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men (MSM/TGW)

Patricia A. Defechereux, Megha Mehrotra, Albert Y. Liu, Vanessa M. McMahan, David V. Glidden, Kenneth H. Mayer, Lorena Vargas, K. Rivet Amico, Piotr Chodacki, Telmo Fernandez, Vivian I. Avelino-Silva, David Burns, Robert M. Grant

We conducted a longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis of depressive symptomology in iPrEx, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of daily, oral FTC/TDF HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men and transgender women who have sex with men. Depression-related adverse events (AEs) were the most frequently reported severe or life-threatening AEs and were not associated with being randomized to the FTC/TDF arm (152 vs. 144 respectively OR 0.66 95 % CI 0.35–1.25). Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and a four questions suicidal ideation scale scores did not differ by arm. Participants reporting forced sex at anal sexual debut had higher CES-D scores (coeff: 3.23; 95 % CI 1.24–5.23) and were more likely to have suicidal ideation (OR 2.2; 95 % CI 1.09–4.26). CES-D scores were higher among people reporting non-condom receptive anal intercourse (ncRAI) (OR 1.46; 95 % CI 1.09–1.94). We recommend continuing PrEP during periods of depression in conjunction with provision of mental health services.

July 13, 2016
Year of publication
2015
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
HIV, HIV prevention, treatment, PrEP, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), Adverse event (AE) Action Guide, center for epidemiologic studies depression (CES-D), depression, transgender women, forced sex, anal sex

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