Costs of facility-based HIV testing in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe

Mwenge L, Sande L, Mangenah C, Ahmed N, Kanema S, d'Elbée M, Sibanda E, Kalua T, Ncube G, Johnson CC, Hatzold K, Cowan FM, Corbett EL, Ayles H, Maheswaran H, Terris-Prestholt F.

Providing HIV testing at health facilities remains the most common approach to ensuring access to HIV treatment and prevention services for the millions of undiagnosed HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. We sought to explore the costs of providing these services across three southern African countries with high HIV burden.

We conclude that health facility based HIV testing remains an essential service to meet HIV universal access goals. The low costs and potential for economies of scale suggests an opportunity for further scale-up. However low uptake in many settings suggests that demand creation or alternative testing models may be needed to achieve economies of scale and reach populations less willing to attend facility based services.

October 23, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
health facilities, HIV testing, HIV treatment, antiretroviral therapy (ART), linkage to care, HIV prevention, facility-based HIV testing, demand creation, alternative testing models, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe

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