The cost‐effectiveness of multi‐purpose HIV and pregnancy prevention technologies in South Africa

Matthew Quaife, Fern Terris‐Prestholt, Robyn Eakle, Maria A. Cabrera Escobar, Maggie Kilbourne‐Brook, Mercy Mvundura, Gesine Meyer‐Rath, Sinead Delany‐Moretlwe, Peter Vickerman

A number of antiretroviral HIV prevention products are efficacious in preventing HIV infection. However, the sexual and reproductive health needs of many women extend beyond HIV prevention, and research is ongoing to develop multi‐purpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that offer dual HIV and pregnancy protection. We do not yet know if these products will be an efficient use of constrained health resources. In this paper, we estimate the cost‐effectiveness of combinations of candidate multi‐purpose prevention technologies (MPTs), in South Africa among general population women and female sex workers (FSWs).

July 23, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
multi-purpose prevention technologies, female sex workers (FSWs), treatment as prevention (TasP), pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)

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