Convenience without disclosure: a formative research study of a proposed integrated methadone and antiretroviral therapy service delivery model in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Alexis Cooke, Haneefa Saleem, Dorothy Mushi, Jessie Mbwambo, Saria Hassan and Barrot H. Lambdin

Though timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a vital component of effective HIV prevention, care and treatment, people who inject drugs are less likely to receive ART than their non-drug using counterparts. In an effort to increase access to ART for people who inject drugs, we examined perceived benefits, challenges, and recommendations for implementing an integrated methadone and ART service delivery model at an opioid treatment program (OTP) clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

February 5, 2018
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
timely initiation of ART, antiretroviral therapy (ART), people who inject drugs (PWID), integrated care, methadone, opioid substitution therapy, opioid treatment program (OTP), integrated services, Tanzania

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