Consolidated guideline on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV

WHO

The starting point for this guideline is the point at which a woman has learnt that she is living with HIV, and it therefore covers key issues for providing comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights-related services and support for women living with HIV. As women living with HIV face unique challenges and human rights violations related to their sexuality and reproduction within their families and communities, as well as from the health-care institutions where they seek care, particular emphasis is placed on the creation of an enabling environment to support more effective health interventions and better health outcomes.

June 19, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Guidelines and Policies
Tags
WHO guidelines, HIV-positive women, women living with HIV, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), stigma and discrimination, care and support

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