Community-Based Indicators for HIV Programs

MEASURE Evaluation

Information from community-based health programs is important for understanding what HIV programs are doing to test, treat, and retain in care people who are living with HIV. However, until now there has been no centralized registry of community-based indicators to inform HIV programming at the community level.

To address the need for standardized monitoring and evaluation at the community level, MEASURE Evaluation developed this collection of community-based indicators for HIV programs. The collection includes detailed indicator definitions and reference details, examples of data use for selected indicators, links to additional resources, and a means to feedback and make recommendations. This collection organizes indicators into five categories: Vulnerable ChildrenPrevention of Mother-to-Child TransmissionKey PopulationsHIV Prevention, and Home-Based Care.

Use of validated indicators allows programs to measure if the beneficiaries of community programs are being assessed and tested, are receiving needed services, and if people living with HIV are adhering to treatment. Use of indicators also increases the likelihood that programs are monitored and that, therefore, more community data is reported into health information systems where they may be used to inform program, management, and service delivery decisions.

July 10, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Programmatic guidance, Tools
Tags
community-based indicators, HIV programs, community-based health programs, HIV testing services, treatment adherence, key populations, vulnerable children, PMTC, home-based care

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