Community-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery for female sex workers in Tanzania: 6-month ART initiation and adherence

W. Tun, L. Apicella, C. Casalini, D. Bikaru, G. Mbita, K. Jeremiah, N. Makyao, T. Koppenhaver, E. Mlanga, L. Vu

SOAR researchers assessed a community-based program that provided female sex workers with mobile or home-based ART services. The findings demonstrate that the community-based model can lead to higher ART initiation and retention rates, and better adherence compared to standard facility-based ART provision. As countries aim to reach the 95–95–95 targets, national HIV responses must expand their strategies to effectively provide ART services, particularly to hard-to-reach key populations.

 

September 2, 2019
Year of publication
2019
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Countries
Tags
home-based ART services, community-based health programs, female sex workers (FSWs), mobile services, Project SOAR

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