Cochrane Library: TB collection

Cochrane Library

The Cochrane Library (ISSN 1465-1858) is a collection of six databases that contain different types of high-quality, independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making, and a seventh database that provides information about Cochrane groups.

Click here to view the collection on tuberculosis (TB).

February 24, 2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles, Literature review, Programmatic guidance, Reports and Fact sheets, Systematic reviews, Websites or databases
Tags
systematic reviews, clinical research, evidence, health care, Cochrane Reviews, tuberculosis, TB

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