Bringing fear into focus: The intersections of HIV and masculine gender norms in Côte d’Ivoire

Danielle Amani Naugle; Natalie Jean Tibbels; Zoe Mistrale Hendrickson; Abdul Dosso; Lynn M. Van Lith; Elizabeth C. Mallalieu; Anne Marie Kouadio; Walter Kra; Diarra Kamara; Patricia Dailly-Ajavon; Adama Cisse; Kim Siefert-Ahanda; Sereen Thaddeus; Stella Babalola and Christopher J. Hoffman

This qualitative research study explored the role of masculinity in men’s engagement in the HIV care continuum in Côte d’Ivoire. The researchers conducted 73 in-depth interviews and 28 focus group discussions with 227 Ivoirian men between November and December 2016 across three urban sites. Participants in the study expressed that fear was the primary barrier to HIV testing and treatment. These men described five value domains–health, sexuality, work and financial success, family, and social status. Men saw HIV as a direct threat to their agency and strength with respect to each of these value domains, thus shedding light on their reluctance to discover their HIV status through HIV testing. With this data, the researchers created the Masculine Values Framework, a descriptive framework of masculine values that can be applied to better understand the behavior men exhibit in Côte d’Ivoire in the face of HIV. The Masculine Values Framework offers practical guidance for developing gender-sensitive HIV-focused social and behavior change programming in Côte d’Ivoire and similar contexts to reach the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

December 18, 2019
Year of publication
2019
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
male engagement, barriers to care, gender norms, gender-sensitive responses

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