Booklet: A long life with HIV

Roger Pebody

This booklet provides information on living well with HIV as you get older.

More and more people living with HIV are now in their fifties, sixties or beyond. You may have had HIV for decades and have a lot of previous experience of HIV and its treatment. Or you may have been diagnosed with HIV more recently and are dealing with a new medical condition as you get older.

To take care of your health, you will need to consider a range of health issues, not just HIV. An active and healthy lifestyle will reduce your risk of having other health conditions on top of HIV.

It’s also important to prepare for the future. There’s information in the last part of the booklet on work and volunteering, dealing with financial concerns, and strengthening your support network.

The information in this booklet is not intended to replace discussion with your medical teams about your treatment and care. However, it may help you decide what questions you’d like to ask healthcare professionals about your health.

September 11, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Booklets
Tags
HIV and ageing, older people living with HIV

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