The benefits and risks of PrEP and kidney function

Amanda Mocroft and Lene Ryom

In their Article in The Lancet HIV, Monica Gandhi and colleagues report a small decrease in renal function, as estimated from creatinine clearance, in people taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV infection. The investigators noted that the decline was increased in participants aged 40 years or older or who had creatinine clearance of 90 mL/min or less. Furthermore, the rate of decline was strongly associated with concentration of tenofovir detected in hair samples.

November 9, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
renal function, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), PrEP, creatinine, kidney function, side effects, treatment, HIV prevention

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