Azithromycin to Reduce Childhood Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa

J.D. Keenan, R.L. Bailey, S.K. West, A.M. Arzika, J. Hart, J. Weaver, K. Kalua, Z. Mrango, K.J. Ray, C. Cook, E. Lebas, K.S. O’Brien, P.M. Emerson, T.C. Porco, and T.M. Lietman

This study hypothesized that mass distribution of a broad-spectrum antibiotic agent to preschool children would reduce mortality in areas of sub-Saharan Africa that are currently far from meeting the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.

In this cluster-randomized trial, four twice-yearly mass distributions of either oral azithromycin (approximately 20 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo were assigned to communities in Malawi, Niger, and Tanzania. Children 1 to 59 months of age were identified in twice-yearly censuses and were offered participation in the trial. Vital status was determined at subsequent censuses. The primary outcome was aggregate all-cause mortality; country-specific rates were assessed in prespecified subgroup analyses.

The study concluded that among postneonatal, preschool children in sub-Saharan Africa, childhood mortality was lower in communities randomly assigned to mass distribution of azithromycin than in those assigned to placebo, with the largest effect seen in Niger. Any implementation of a policy of mass distribution would need to strongly consider the potential effect of such a strategy on antibiotic resistance.

 
May 2, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
childhood mortality, child mortality, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Malawi, Tanzania, Niger, azithromycin, antibiotics, antibiotic resistance

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