Assessment of provider-initiated HIV screening in Nigeria with sub-Saharan African comparison

Ogbo, F.A., Mogaji, A., Ogeleka, P., et al.

Despite Nigeria’s high HIV prevalence, voluntary testing and counselling rates remain low. UNAIDS/WHO/CDC recommends provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) for HIV in settings with high HIV prevalence. We aimed to assess the acceptability and logistical feasibility of the PITC strategy among adolescents and adults in a secondary health care centre in Idekpa Benue state, Nigeria.

April 3, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
Nigeria, voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), voluntary testing and counseling (VTC), provider initiated testing and counseling (PITC)

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