4th Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Conference

4th Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Conference

The Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s biannual conference focuses on clinical content for HIV and TB health care workers in the region. This year's programme has been carefully designed to benefit all health care practitioners, with topics ranging from new antiretroviral drugs, AIDS-related complications, opportunistic infections, promoting adherence and ethical issues.

The conference will include presentations, debates, plenaries, practical sessions, and skills-building workshops. The conference is also a fantastic opportunity to network with fellow health care workers and researchers in the field of HIV.

Download the conference programme.

October 18, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Conference
Tags
HIV, AIDS, ARVs, antiretroviral treatment, pediatric HIV, adolescent HIV, nursing, opportunistic infections, drug resistance, clinical research, prevention, tuberculosis, antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drugs, ART, treatment, HIV prevention, TB, PMTCT, AIDS-related complications, adherence, research ethics, research, South Africa, health care workers, co-infection, ethics, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)

Resources

HIV self-screening programme: Transport Hub Sexual Health and HIV Survey, Awareness and Distribution Project

With men remaining largely under-tested, the Unitaid-funded HIV Self-Testing Africa (STAR) Initiative has launched a campaign targeting men at transportation hubs, such as taxi ranks and bus stops, in order to raise awareness about and distribute self-test kits to those who are unaware of their HIV status.

Preventing HIV during pregnancy and breastfeeding in the context of PrEP: Technical brief

PrEP could complement established HIV prevention strategies for pregnant and breastfeeding women as part of a comprehensive package to reduce HIV infections among women and transmission from mothers to infants in settings with high HIV incidence.

Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of cryptococcal disease in HIV-infected adults, adolescents and children: Supplement to the 2016 consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection

Cryptococcal disease is an opportunistic infection that occurs primarily among people with advanced HIV disease and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this group.

Updated recommendations on first-line and second-line antiretroviral regimens and post-exposure prophylaxis and recommendations on early infant diagnosis of HIV: interim guidance

Since 2016, WHO has recommended tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) + lamivudine (3TC) (or emtricitabine, FTC) + efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg as the preferred first- line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for adults and adolescents. WHO recommended dolutegravir (DTG) as an alternative option to EFV for first-line ART because of the uncertainty regarding the safety and efficacy of DTG during pregnancy and among people living with HIV receiving rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment. New WHO interim guidelines contain recommendations regarding preferred first-line regimens for adults, adolescents and children initiating ART, which now include DTG and RAL.

UNAIDS Explainer: Undetectable = untransmittable

Undetectable = untransmittable is the message of a new UNAIDS Explainer. With 20 years of evidence demonstrating that HIV treatment is highly effective in reducing the transmission of HIV, the evidence is now clear that people living with HIV with an undetectable viral load cannot transmit HIV sexually.

Guidelines: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adolescents and young adults

Two documents have been developed. The first provides a quick reference and summary of the main aspects related to supporting antiretroviral therapy adherence for HIV positive adolescents and young adults.

Blogs

key pops

Treating key and mobile populations as people, not public health problems

Of no surprise to those in the HIV field, the epidemic continues to be fueled by stigma, none more evident than among key and mobile populations, such as people who inject drugs and sex workers. Speakers at the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society conference shared their experiences in working with these groups and challenged participants to view them as people – and not merely a public health problem.  
Dr. Helena Rabie

Pediatric HIV care: great progress through PMTCT, but increased efforts needed on testing and treatment

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs have been incredibly successful across southern Africa. However, presentations at the second day of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society Conference highlighted important gaps in pediatric testing and treatment.
U=U

The debate on Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U): will it work in Africa?

What happens when there is clear science supporting a specific health intervention, but large-scale program implementation raises questions about its application?

Similar Resources

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