Lancet IAS 2017 collection

To mark the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science, the Lancet journals have made a selection of content free that reflects some of the breadth and diversity of clinical, epidemiological, and operational HIV research produced by the tireless global HIV community. The content includes research published across the Lancet titles—taken from six of our journals, well established and recently launched. The growing family of journals offers an increasing number of outlets for HIV research that build on and expand The Lancet’s longstanding engagement with and commitment to the work of the global HIV community.

July 25, 2017
Year of publication
2017
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
IAS 2017, 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science, HIV research

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