Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patients Accept Finger Stick Blood Collection for Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing

Géraldine Daneau, Natasha Gous, Lesley Scott, Joachim Potgieter, Luc Kestens, Wendy Stevens

HIV-infected patients require antiretroviral treatment for life. To improve access to care, CD4 enumeration and viral load tests have been redesigned to be used as point-of-care techniques using finger-stick blood. Accurate CD4 counting in capillary blood requires a free flowing blood drop that is achieved by blade incision. The aim of this study was to assess the attitude of the patients toward blade-based finger-stick blood donation.

September 8, 2016
Year of publication
2016
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
access to care, CD4 enumeration, viral load testing, point-of-care, finger-stick testing, CD4 cell count testing

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