Does distance to clinic affect utilization of HIV care and treatment services

Dr Gesine Meyer-Rath

We assessed the relationship between distance to clinic and progression through the HIV care cascade. We have two key findings. First, distance matters but only for women. Second, for women, distance affected linkage to care, but was not associated with later transitions in the care cascade. It is possible that distance is a less important barrier once people find out their HIV status, learn about treatment, and overcome the hurdle of their first clinic visit.

February 21, 2019
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Briefs
Countries
Tags
distance to health facilities, structural barriers, care cascade, linkage to care, HE2RO

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