Do female sex workers have lower uptake of HIV treatment services than non-sex workers? A cross-sectional study from east Zimbabwe

Rebecca Rhead, Jocelyn Elmes, Eloghene Otobo, Kundai Nhongo, Albert Takaruza, Peter J White, Constance Anesu Nyamukapa, Simon Gregson

Globally, HIV disproportionately affects female sex workers (FSWs) yet HIV treatment coverage is suboptimal. To improve uptake of HIV services by FSWs, it is important to identify potential inequalities in access and use of care and their determinants. Our aim is to investigate HIV treatment cascades for FSWs and non-sex workers (NSWs) in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, and to examine the socio-demographic characteristics and intermediate determinants that might explain differences in service uptake.

April 20, 2018
Year of publication
2018
Resource types
Journal and research articles
Tags
ART coverage, female sex workers (FSWs), Zimbabwe, antiretroviral therapy (ART), uptake of services, treatment cascade, service uptake, HIV testing and treatment services

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